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, in the area from washington d.c. to new york and boston. and let me say i think it is absolutely critical that we develop that corridor. not only the regional interest but the national interest. we have the highest concentration of population, the most sophisticated delivery system and interconnection, we have light rail, subway, metro, connectors all up and down the corridor so that high-speed rail is not something that will run by itself as opposed to last week where we heard about the major red ministrations effort to produce high speed, they're doing it between bakersfield and fresno, california where there are very few people, their contention is long-term connected in population centers in san francisco and los angeles, but it will be a long time before that is accomplished. right now we do have the connectivity we need to, the population, and we also have the only corridor, 430 some mile corridor almost entirely unknown by amtrak, the american people and the taxpayers. that is opposed to the rest of amtrak service, 20,000 miles of service, long-distance, inner-city service, on whic
and that is what he was searching for. many classmates call him barry and when he got to new york, those four years in new york city people call him barry and some call him barack. >> host: why did he choose occidental and why transfer to colombia? >> guest: he of people who were going there and the way he tells the story, there was a girly in honolulu who was in that area so he got that -- it was like the next step. it was comfortable, beautiful, small, elite, california sunshine, very comfortable. it was an important two years. restarted to expand intellectually. he got his first sense of destiny in those two years but left because it was too -- he wanted to experience the world and was finding himself. taken to los angeles, to new york and chicago but it is important to get to new york first. he starts his junior year. >> host: his first night in new york city. >> i was a little dubious but turns out to be true. he was not that spending night in that apartment would be better, but he couldn't get in. he couldn't get the keys and couldn't find the landlord, a friend of a friend of his mother, he
, "the new york times," the paris review, the yale review and elsewhere. she has been the recipient of the irish times' prize for international fiction, the rea award for the short story, the o'henry award and a landen fellowship. she was a member of the american academy of arts and letters, and it gives me great pleasure to introduce lori moore. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> the other members of this year's jury for the national book award in fiction are stacy, dinale and janet perry. [applause] why would these otherwise sane, reasonable and brilliant people consent to this chore? one where you make a thousand enemies and maybe only one friend, one where your front porch fills up with packages, and your neighbors think you have a terrible late night online shopping habit. [laughter] through the entire spring and summer. one does it for the champagne, of course, even if the champagne turns out to have a lot of peach stuff in it. [laughter] but one does it, also, to be part of a celebration of the deep mind melt that is reading. how else is a human mind is so fully and exquiz italy -- exquis
in the u.s. today, there are many more over the year to be licensees than people realize. in new york, where i'm from, the number's 28. and there was a large allocation of these licenses before cable and satellite. and what we're doing now, and this is, i think, the innovation of incentive auctions is to say how can we use market mechanisms to reallocate some of that spectrum to mobile broadband in a win very win way? >> uh-huh. >> and that is what we're doing. that is why there will be broadcasters who remain in markets like new york and others who are healthy and, indeed, stronger. but there's also tremendous opportunity to generate revenue and promote innovation. >> when we moved over the 200 megahertz, we had a two-star general sit here and say you just can't do it. it's technologically impossible to do. so, again, do you have a process that's totally fair to the broadcasters and to the wireless industry that's in place? have you had them in your office simultaneously with their engineers to talk about the issues so that you can hear and your experts can hear the differences which
. and i became aware of that in a dramatic way when my boss called me up to new york and said, hey, what the heck is going on? what's going on in europe? how serious is this? are we really at the beginning of what might become a war? i said i haven't a clue, but if you want to send me there i would be delighted to go. and so i went over there for the better part of a year, floating around in that part of the world. i thought myself, quite extraordinary what was seen in germany especially. and i would like to ask, perhaps i could start with rick burt, and ask him to answer a simple question as you lay the groundwork year. were we really dealing with a serious strategic threat from the soviet union? >> well, that's a great, that's a great question. i think if you look at the deployments that you were just talking about of the ss-20, the western military district of the soviet union, in a broader context, a broad modernization and build up of the russian nuclear forces, marvin, i think not only viewed as a threat militarily, but it was also viewed in a word we used to use at that time, also
and fiscal issues. see it live starting at 10 a.m. on c-span. >> we're at the new york state museum. this is our gallery that's dedicated to the history of september 11th and the attacks in new york at the world trade center. we decided with the gallery to tell the story, um, for the first moments of the attacks using objects and photographs from the world trade center site. this is a piece of steel from the south tower, world trade center floors 7-9. we put it in a place where the public can actually come and touch it. it gives the visitor a real tangible experience. this is a piece of steel from the north towers, floors 31-7 -- 71-74. this is a dramatically bent piece of steel. it's -- this is within ten floors of the impact of flight 11 from the north tower, and, again, you can see the openings where the windows would have been and pieces of this metal strip that would have held the aluminum clad on the front of the building. every piece of steel is marked so you know which building, which floor and which side of the building it's on. so we research that. this one we picked becau
, philadelphia, new york city, boston, the most congested corridor in the united states of america, that is the only 600 miles that we really own. we another small stretches around the commuter -- all the rest of amtrak service, over 20,000 miles of private freight rail. i see the main rail people in the audience and they have concerns too about using theirs and not having dedicated them and we need to address that issue as we move forward. final point is northeast quarter is where we should be putting the focus. give the administration credit for at least taking the money that has been turned back dedicating so that to the northeast quarter but we are doing it in a piecemeal, half baked fashion. the northeast corridor, every state, every major area can benefit by bringing high-speed rail to the northeast corridor. 70% of our air traffic delays emanate from the northeast corridor even when we have next-generation air traffic control, move planes faster and closer together with doubling of air-traffic, all of the other restrictions we have in that corridor, you must have high-speed
works well for massachusetts and new york. let's build on that. many of the bill of rights. george mason he gives u.s. virginia bill of rights. that's model for the federal bill of rights. abolition of slavery occurred in several states. and we have to study, you know, and make amendments. what has gone before us. we have the duty to the future, i think we danger it best when we actually are understanding or respectful of the past. that's part of the national archives is about. if i could just, on a personal note, tell you the story why i'm here. and justice thomas' presence needs no explanation. he's justice thomas. what the heck am i doing here? well, when i was 11 years old, i came to the national archives, and i got this document that is big, big verse of the emancipation proclamation, and it was edition of the emancipation proclamation. you can take a look at the 100th anniversary of september 1962 and the archives released that a special edition for kids like me. and i got my picture of maybe lincoln. i'm a lincoln man too. [laughter] you don't throw anything out. [laughter] >> i d
a quarter century ago. i was a reporter for "the new york times" back then, and i had the great privilege of covering in particular senator lieberman, senator daniel patrick moynihan and senator bill bradley. and i got to tell you, i had a lot of fun. [laughter] that was a great job to have. and over the years you have fought consistently to expand freedom's reach at home and abroad. my staff and i were honored when the aftermath of the september 11th attacks you became a distinguished adviser to this organization and a member of our leadership council. and a great credit to you, also, is the talented and dedicated staff you have assembled and has worked for you so well over the years. it is a treat and a privilege that we get to work with them. i just need to say that. senator kyl, working with you and your staff, also immensel talented people, smart, dedicated on a range of issues. it's been an honor, but also an education about missile defense. see, you use those acronyms, i know what he means. you have been committed to policies that promote peace through strength, you have steadfastl
. >> former new york times photo critics vicki goldberg has gathered her favorite white house photos in the white house, the president's home in photographs in history. sunday evening at 7:30 eastern and pacific on american history tv on c-span3. >> now a hearing on the conflict in the eastern congo. house foreign affairs subcommittee is looking into the administration's efforts to resolve the crisis in the region and rwanda's support of congolese rebels. this is a little more than 2-1/2 hours. >> we will come to order and good afternoon. i apologize for the lateness in starting. today's hearing will examine u.s. policy in the democratic republic of congo, this was exacerbated by rwanda's intervention in neighboring eastern congo as documented by the release of three united nations reports this year. these reports confirm rwanda's support of militias who have ravaged and continue to plague this region. the state's--unable to testify at the sept. 19 hearing on this issue. the subcommittee promised to follow up was available to testify. the aftermath of the genocide, the administration
. >> before you can drive a car. >> you don't always have a gun in many localities. >> former new york times editor craig whitney on the history of gun ownership and then control in america from living with guns:a liberal's case for the second amendment saturday night at 10:00 eastern on booktv's afterwards, part of four days of nonfiction books and authors on c-span2. >> democratic senator daniel inouye died monday at the age of 88. the senate's senior member was serving his seventh term. tribute continued yesterday. this portion is an hour. >> first, my friend, chairman of the judiciary committee has been honored to receive one of the senate's high honors in the senate, i congratulate him on that. join with him in expressing my sadness over the passing of senator daniel inouye. he came to this government starting government service, 60 years ago in the territorial legislature of hawaii and came to congress when hawaii became a state in 59 and the senate in 63, only in service to robert bird -- to robert byrd. this is a serious man, a solid man, patriot, and one who always had a good spirit
of the foreign affairs committee. and the next ranking member from new york. thank you for coming. yeah, we appreciate it. he's going to be the ranking member of the full committee, so we're pleased to have both of you here today. and with that, we'll go ahead with your statement. and if we could keep your statements to five minutes, it would be great. >> it will be. mr. chairman, honorable members, thank you for the opportunity to testify. iranian officials sometimes quip they play chess while americans play checkers. increasingly, this appears to be the case in the caucuses and the surrounding region. while many policymakers describe the islamic republic as a regional power, the iranians themselves now describe themselves as a, quote-unquote, pan-regional power. iranians have a sense as strong as that of russian nationalists who pine to exert their influence over the states of the soviet union. azerbaijan and georgia are front and center in this conception. they combine both terror campaigns and soft power. beyond headline-grabbing bombings and assassination plots, the islamic republic lo
women's leadership academy in the harlem area of new york city, one of the first and most successful pilot projects for girls public schools with which i know the presiding officer is very familiar. and i remember the time i invited senator barbara mikulski to texas, because she and i have worked together supporting for so many years, and this year have been, she chair, and i ranking members of the appropriations subcommittee. we went to visit the johnson space center because i wanted her to see the great work they are doing there. and then i took her to the houston rodeo, because i wanted her to see the texas culture. well, i'm not sure that the senator who grew up in the inner city of baltimore knew exactly how people would dress at the rodeo, but suffice it to say, there were a lot of rhinestones and cowboy boots and big hair and big hats. senator mikulski whispered to me during this time, kay, if we were here monday and we went to the chamber of commerce, do these people look like this? and i said, yes, pretty much. so senator mikulski and i also teamed up to pass the homemaker i
to assist the construction of up to 120,000 new homes and delivering on flood defend schemes in more cities. on top of broadband expansion for our countryside and larger cities, we're funding broadband in 123 smaller -- 12 smaller cities, cambridge, darby, oxford, portsmouth, york, newport, aberdeen, and derry, londonderry. in addition to a third of a billion pounds announced this autumn for british science, we are today announcing 600 million pounds more for the u.k. scientific research infrastructure, and since improving our education system is the best investment in a competitive economy, i am today committing 270 million pounds to fund improvements in further education colleges and one billion pounds to expand good schools and build 100 new free schools and academies. [cheers and applause] mr. speaker, scotland, wales and northern ireland will get their share of additional capital spending put at their disposal as involved in administrations. on top of this five billion pounds of support for business, we are ready to provide guarantees for up to 40 billion pounds more. today i can annou
at one building on park avenue in new york and he was able to do it because they happened to have the statistics that isolate that one building. do you know what he found? that the average income in that building was $1,167,000 for the year. $1,167,000. the average tax rate of the people in that building was 14.7%. the janitor in that building had an income of $33,000 and he paid a tax rate of 24.9%. is this fair? is it fair that people making $1.1 million paid a tax rate of 14.7% and the janitor who served them, earning $33,000 a year, paid a tax rate of 24.9%? well, i personally don't think so. and i know all the arguments. i've served on the finance committee. i've heard it all. the biggest reason for this differential, by the way, is not the earned income tax rate, which has had almost all of the attention in this national discussion. almost all of the attention has been on the earned income tax rate and raising it from 35% to 39.6%. almost no attention has been paid to the unearned income tax rate on capital gains and dividends. the unearned rate is currently 15%. that's what
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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